Laughing leads to learning

What's your mother's name?

What's your mother's name?

What's your mother's name?

Many of you probably don`t know that teaching children about their names and their family members’ names, it`s not easy at all!  So one day I asked one of my students “ What is Mom’s name?” Without hesitation, he said, “Mom.” I tried rephrasing the question with “Yes. You call her Mom. What do other people call your Mom?” He seemed a bit confused so I got more specific, “What does your Dad call your Mom?”
“OH!” he replied, “Crazy!”


A gift for you!

What's your mother's name?

What's your mother's name?

Christmas time, a boy came up to me with a gift bag and said, “Here teacher, my mom got this chocolate box and she didn’t want it, so she said to just bring it to school and give it to you!”  I love how they tell the truth! If only their parents knew how much they really tell us!!! 

"Abracadabra!"

What's your mother's name?

"Abracadabra!"

A little boy once asks me to tie his shoes.

 I ask, "What's the magic word?" 

And he excitedly says, "Abracadabra!" 

He was right! 

T-O-A-D

Fair enough!

"Abracadabra!"

“How do you spell toad?” one of my 5 years old students asked. “We just read a story about a toad,” I said, then helped him spell it out: “T-O-A-D.” Satisfied, he finished writing the story he’d begun, then read it aloud: “I toad my mama I wanted a dog for my birthday.” 

Continents!

Fair enough!

Fair enough!

I've always had in my class one of those colourful carpets with the seven continents on it.  Well, one day a little boy, got very sick and threw upon it. When his dad came to take him home, he proudly says, “Daddy, I threw up all over North America and South America!”  

No doubt he had paid attention to the lesson.

Fair enough!

Fair enough!

Fair enough!

 One morning I was urging a student to get down to work, he looked up and me and said, “You do know that I didn’t sign up for this. My parents did it.” 

Fair enough!

Well, Snap!

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

  

(I teach a preschool class with four-year-olds. On the way in from the playground, one girl is excited to talk about her sister.)

Girl: “Miss, guess what? My sister knows how to snap. She showed me.”

Me: “Wow, that’s so cool.”

Boy: “Oh, yeah? Well, my sister knows how to Snapchat!”

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

 

(I work in pre-school. One of my colleagues is just preparing paint for an activity.)

Coworker: “Hey, [My Name], how do you mix black?”

Me: “…”

Coworker: *completely serious* “If I take grey and add some white it should work, right?”

Gladly No Hot Wind Coming From The Parents

Their Knowledge Contains Too Many Grey Areas

Gladly No Hot Wind Coming From The Parents

 

(I teach at a preschool, and I have the kids out on the playground.)

Parent: “Oh, it’s a bit windy out here, isn’t it?”

Me: “Yes, it’s a little windier than I expected it to be, but it’s really not too bad.”

Parent: “Is it always this windy on the playground?”

Me: “Only when it’s a windy day…?”

(Parent, completely satisfied with my answer, picked up her child and left.)

Raising A Generation Of Sharks

Raising A Generation Of Sharks

Gladly No Hot Wind Coming From The Parents

  

Preschooler: “Ms. [My Name]! I made a painting of you!”

Me: “Oh, how sweet! What am I doing?”

Preschooler: “Swimming in the ocean.”

Me: “Oh, that sounds nice. I love swimming in the ocean.”

Preschooler: “Yeah, but there are sharks there, too.”

(Well, all right, then. The life of a preschool teacher is never boring!)

Lesson Number One

Raising A Generation Of Sharks

Lesson Number One

 

(I’m an assistant preschool teacher for two year olds, and while we do actually teach preschool for three and four year olds, the two-year-old program is more of a daycare. We’ve gone outside for recess, and one of the boys who is in the process of being potty-trained suddenly gets the urge to urinate, and pulls his pants down while we are outside. My co-teacher sees this, and doesn’t really know what to say, so she screams the first thing that comes to mind.)

Co-Teacher: “[Little Boy], PUT THAT BACK!”

PLEASE!

Raising A Generation Of Sharks

Lesson Number One

 

 

(I teach preschool part time in the three-year-old class. I’m sitting on the floor fitting together wooden train tracks when a little girl thrusts a bridge in my face.)

Girl: “Put this on next.”

Me: “Why don’t you try asking nicely and say please.”

Girl: “I don’t know that word.”

Tell me your story

Kika on kids

SOME MORE INFO

THE ABSORBENT MIND

Absorbent mind refers to the mind's capacity to take in information and sensations from the world that surrounds it. The fundamental task of the child during this phase of conscious absorption (3-6 years) is intellectual development and freedom. His mind compels him to sort through, order, and make sense of the information he unconsciously absorbed. It is through this order of his intelligence that the child gains the freedom to move purposely, to concentrate, and to choose his own direction.

"The 'absorbent mind' welcomes everything, puts its hope in everything, accepts poverty equally with wealth, adopts any religion and the prejudices and habits of its countrymen, incarnating all in itself. This is the child!" Maria Montessori

LAUGHING LEADS TO LEARNING

Research suggests that humor produces psychological and physiological benefits that help students learn.
However, a growing body of research suggests that, when used effectively, classroom comedy can improve student performance by reducing anxiety, boosting participation and increasing students' motivation to focus on the material. Moreover, the benefits might not be limited to students: Research suggests that students rate professors who make learning fun significantly higher than others.
SOURCES:
American psychological associations


 

CIRCLE TIME IN THE MONTESSORI CLASSROOM

What is circle time?  A time in which the children are gathered (in the shape of circle) to learn information together.

Why a circle shape? To allow the children an equal view of each other and the teacher conducting the circle, and the teacher conducting the circle a good view of all the children.


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