Very Important Children – Santa Claus

ShareShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Per la versione in Italiano Clicca Qui.

Hi everyone,

Christmas is almost here, are you guys excited???

What`s your plans for Christmas beside eat a lot of food and peppermint bars?

Today I want to talk about one of the most famous characters on Christmas: Santa Claus!

I know is not really a Baby VIP, but still he is kind a VIP.

But let`s get started:

All children know that Santa Claus comes from the North Pole, is bearded and overweight and the night between 24 and 25 December brings presents to children around the world traveling on a sleigh pulled by reindeer.

But the story of this beloved character of folklore is long and fascinating almost like his legend.

Santa Claus was born on the shores of the Mediterranean, evolves in Northern Europe and assumes its final form (Santa Claus) in the New World, from where it is propagated in almost every part of the globe.

In the beginning was St. Nicholas, a Greek born about 280 A.D. who became Bishop of Myra, South Roman city of Asia Minor, now Turkey. Nicholas earned a reputation as a fierce defender of the Christian faith in the years of persecution and spent many years in prison until, in 313, Constantine issued the Edict of Milan which authorized the cult. The iconography has handed down several of its images, but neither looks too cheerful big man, overweight and a white beard that today we attribute to Santa Claus.

It remains to explain how this holy Mediterranean has moved to the North Pole and has been associated with Christmas. In fact, for many centuries the cult of St. Nicholas – and the tradition of giving gifts to children – it continued to be celebrate on December 6, as is still in various areas of northern Italy and Germany. But the Protestant Reformation, in the sixteenth century, abolished the cult of the saints in much of northern Europe. “It was a big problem.” “Who would bring gifts to children? “. In the Germanic world, born some figures in the middle between an elf and a demon.  Although it may seem strange, but even by these characters comes the figures of an old funny man in a sleigh.

The northern European immigrants brought with them these legends when they founded the first colonies in the New World. In the first decades of the nineteenth century, many poets and writers began to make efforts to turn Christmas into a family party. Also recovering the legend of St. Nicholas. Already in a book of 1809, Washington Irving imagined a Nicola passing on rooftops with his flying chariot bringing gifts to good children. Then it was the turn of an anonymous poem, The Children’s Friend, with the first real appearance of Santa Claus, associated with Christmas “but deprived of any religious characteristics, dressed with the typical fur of the German bearers’ gifts, “. This Santa brings gifts but also inflicts punishments to the bad children, and his chariot is pulled by one reindeer. In the poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas”, written in 1822 by Clement Clark Moore for his children which became quickly “viral” the reindeer become eight, and the wagon becomes a sleigh. For many decades, Santa Claus is depicted with various features and clothes of various shapes and colors. Only towards the end of the century, thanks to the illustrations by Thomas Nast, it forces the “standard” version: an overweight adult, red dress with white fur edges running from the North Pole with his sleigh pulled by reindeer, and is careful to children`s behave.

Thanks also to the advertising of Coca-Cola, the figure of Santa Claus returns to Europe in a sort of reverse migration, adopting names as Pere Noel, Father Christmas or Babbo Natale and replacing wherever the old bearers of gifts.

Did you guys know about all that?

I didn`t! I also found out another fun curiosity:

So, the eight reindeer are named for the first time by Clement Clarke Moore with the names: Kasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen Comet, Cupid, Dander and Blitzen. It was added later Rudolph, the ninth reindeer, in a song by Gene Autry.

I still love Santa Claus, Babbo Natale for me, and I still remember when one Christmas he rang my home doorbell.

It was magical wait for Santa Claus, and I hope it`s magic for your kids too.

I can`t wait to hear what do you think about Santa Claus and his amazing biography!

Don`t forget to leave me your comments!!!

…and don`t forget… it`s Christmas, all of us with a little bit we can make a difference… DONATE!!!

SEATTLE CHILDRENS

UNICEF

ACTIONAID

SAVE THE CHILDREN.

I hope you all have a good week…

A big kiss from KiKa

There are reasons to believe in a better world:

Don`t forget to Subscribe.

[wysija_form id=”2″]

Per la versione in Italiano Clicca Qui.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *