ShareShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Per la versione in Italiano Clicca Qui.

 

Hi everyone,

How are you???

Today I want to tell you about something I loved to do when I was a little girl!

A couple of days ago I was in class and one of my teacher was teaching us how to use some works from practical life.

One of the work have for material my favorite game of when I was a little girl.

The FUSED BEADS!

OMG!

The whole thing reminded me of all the hours that I spent in my grandmother’s house playing with these beads.

Waiting, the best part that was when she would melt the beads together with an iron.

So after all this wonderful moment in my past I decided to look around online for find out if one of my favorite past toys has a story to share.

Well… let me be honest, I didn`t find a super big cool story like Barbie or the Rainbow loom one but still, what I found is really interesting!!!!

So, are you ready???

For all those who did not understand what I’m talking about, I will start by telling you that the toys are basically a spirited beading plate where you put plastic beads in different colors in a pattern. It´s almost like mosaic. When you are done, you can either remove it from the plate or iron it. The heat from the iron causes the plastic beads to melt together. You can reuse the plate after ironing because you take the beads off from the plate.

Plastic toy beads are made by chopping plastic tubes into short pieces, were introduced in 1958 by Munkplast AB in Munka-Ljungby, Sweden, under the brand Nabbi. Known as Indian beads, they were originally sewn together to form ribbons.

The pegboard for the beads was invented by a Swedish man called Gunnar Knutsson in the 1960s in Vällingby, which is in Stockholm. He experimented with the Indian pearls and put it on a piece of wood with spikes. Later he patented a bead in plastic.

Working with this beads was at the beginning a therapy material for the old people but it also became popular for children.

The bead designs were glued to cardboard or Masonite boards and used as trivets. Later, when the beads were made of polyethylene, it became possible to fuse them with a flat iron.

In 2005, Munkplast/Nabbi  introduced the Photo Pearls software that converts digital photos to bead designs.

Hama come in three sizes: mini (diameter 2.5 mm), midi (5 mm) and maxi (10 mm).

Perler  beads come in two sizes called classic (5 mm) and biggie (10 mm).

Pyssla beads (by IKEA) only come in one size (5 mm).

The beads now come in many colors and degrees of transparency/opacity, including varieties that glow in the dark or have internal glitter; peg boards come in various shapes and several geometric patterns.

The most famous one now are the Perler beads that has become more common among artists but also among videogame enthusiasts, where they make pixel art by video game characters.

What can I say I loved this game even if I don`t remember how I found out about it!

I`m sure that if my grandmother would be able to read this post she will remember me sit on her table placing with attention the beads in one of my peg board, just for finish my design and ask her to iron my new creation!

I still remember the smell…and how close I was putting my nose to be able to see if it worked!

For sure I know that she will undoubtedly remember how many beads she found around her house!!!😂😂😂

I hope you enjoyed the post… Don`t forget to leave me your comments and let me know if your kids play with these beads!!!

Have a good weekend…

Kiss from KiKa.

Per la versione in Italiano Clicca Qui.

ShareShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Pages: 1 2